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Aviation Maintenance

47.0607 A/F - 47.0608 P/P

(Associate of Applied Science Degree)

The Aviation Maintenance program prepares individuals for employment in the aircraft maintenance industry.  Aircraft mechanics are employed by the airlines, aircraft manufacturing companies, repair stations, the United States military, and general aviation fixed base operators.  Some mechanics specialize in work on a particular part of an aircraft, such as metal or fabric surfaces, avionics equipment, hydraulic systems, landing gear, propellers or engines.  Others, particularly those employed by the smaller fixed base operators, work on many different aircraft systems and may inspect and repair many different types of aircraft.  State Technical College of Missouri has been certified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) as an Aviation Maintenance Technician School since 1970.  The Aviation Maintenance program is also accredited by the Association of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering (ATMAE).

The program provides extensive hands-on training in small classes with well-trained teachers. Equipment and curriculum are up-to-date and include non-destructive testing, composites, electrical systems troubleshooting and reciprocating and turbine engine theory and maintenance, to name a few.

Many jobs in the aircraft maintenance industry require mechanics that are certified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Two ratings are applicable to this certification: Airframe and Powerplant. Three options are offered in Aviation Maintenance: an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) in Aviation Maintenance, a certificate in Aviation Maintenance (Powerplant), and a certificate in Aviation Maintenance (Airframe). The AAS degree program provides the experience required to obtain the aircraft mechanic certificate with Airframe and Powerplant ratings. Each certificate program provides the experience required to obtain the aircraft mechanic certificate with the rating appropriate for the program completed.

The Aviation Maintenance program is divided into three sections: General, Airframe and Powerplant. Students enrolled in the Associate of Applied Science Degree program typically complete the General and Powerplant sections by the end of the third semester, and the Airframe section by the end of the fourth semester.

Graduation requirements of the Aviation Maintenance program include: 1) earning a grade of C (70%) or better in all “Core Curriculum” courses and a math course, and 2) taking and passing the FAA General and Powerplant or Airframe Aviation Written examinations.

Program Mission
The mission of the Aviation Maintenance program is to provide individuals with opportunities for educational experiences that enable them to develop the skills necessary for employment in the aviation maintenance industry.

Program Goals
The goals of the program are to: 

  • Provide the opportunity for students to develop the technical skills necessary for employment in the aviation maintenance industry.
  • Assist students in their preparation to meet the technical knowledge requirement for mechanic certification, required by Federal Aviation Regulation, Part 65.
  • Provide the opportunity for students to develop core skills in general education in reading, writing, mathematics, and science reasoning.

Program Assessments

  • PSI Lasergrade Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
  • Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP)

 

CORE CURRICULUM
Credit Hours

TAM

107

Federal Regulations for Aviation Technicians

2

TAM

109

Aircraft Structural Materials and Corrosion Control

2

TAM

113

General Mechanics

2

TAM

125

Basic Electricity

2

TAM

127

Reciprocating Engines and Lubrication Systems

4

TAM

131

Propeller Systems

2

TAM

134

Turbine Engines and Accessory Systems

4

TAM

136

Powerplant Fuel Systems

2

TAM

139

Powerplant Electrical Systems

4

TAM

150

Physics for Aviation Maintenance Technicians

2

TAM

200

Auxiliary Systems and Inspections for Powerplants

5

TAM

208

Introduction to Aircraft Welding

2

TAM

211

Assembly and Rigging

2

TAM

213

Sheetmetal and Non-metallic Structures

4

TAM

217

Aircraft Fluid Power Systems

2

TAM

220

Aircraft Covering, Finishes and Woods

2

TAM

224

Aircraft Instrumentation and Avionics Systems

3

TAM

226

Aircraft Electrical Systems

4

TAM

228

Airframe Systems and Inspections

2

 

 

SUB-TOTAL

52

       
GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
General Education Requirements
19
May Not Include:  
ASC 104 Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab I
4
ASC 106 Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab II
4
NST 101 Network Fundamentals
3
    SUB-TOTAL
19
     
GRADUATION REQUIREMENT
COM 125 Job Search Strategies
1
     
It is a graduation requirement of the Aviation Maintenance program for students to: 1) earn a grade of C (70%) or better in all “Core Curriculum” courses and a math course, and 2) take and pass the FAA General and Powerplant or Airframe Aviation Written examinations.
       
    PROGRAM TOTAL
72
       

 

AVIATION MAINTENANCE
47.0608

(One-Year Powerplant Certificate)

 
       
CORE CURRICULUM
Credit Hours
TAM 107 Federal Regulations for Aviation Technicians
2
TAM 109 Aircraft Structural Materials and Corrosion Control
2
TAM 113 General Mechanics
2
TAM 125 Basic Electricity
2
TAM 127 Reciprocating Engines and Lubrication Systems
4
TAM 131 Propeller Systems
2
TAM 134 Turbine Engines and Accessory Systems
4
TAM 136 Powerplant Fuel Systems
2
TAM 139 Powerplant Electrical Systems
4
TAM 150 Physics for Aviation Maintenance Technicians
2
TAM 200 Auxiliary Systems and Inspections for Powerplants
5
    SUB-TOTAL
31
     
GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

Must Include:

Three credit hours from Area 1. Oral & Written Communication
3
AND
Three credit hours from Area 5. Technical Literacy
3
May Not Include:  
NST 101 Network Fundamentals
3

 

  SUB-TOTAL
6
     
PROGRAM REQUIREMENT
MAT 031 Preparatory Mathematics
4
OR    
SPM 030 Self-paced Preparatory Mathematics
NC
    SUB-TOTAL
0-4
     
GRADUATION REQUIREMENT
COM 125 Job Search Strategies
1
    SUB-TOTAL
1
 
It is a graduation requirement of the Aviation Maintenance program for students to: 1) earn a grade of C (70%) or better in all “Core Curriculum” courses and a math course, and 2) take and pass the FAA General and Powerplant or Airframe Aviation Written examinations.
     
    PROGRAM TOTAL
38-42
     

 

AVIATION MAINTENANCE
47.0607

(One-Year Airframe Certificate)

     
CORE CURRICULUM
Credit Hours
TAM 107 Federal Regulations for Aviation Technicians
2
TAM 109 Aircraft Structural Materials and Corrosion Control
2
TAM 113 General Mechanics
2
TAM 125 Basic Electricity
2
TAM 150 Physics for Aviation Maintenance Technicians
2
TAM 208 Introduction to Aircraft Welding
2
TAM 211 Assembly and Rigging
2
TAM 213 Sheet Metal and Non-metallic Structures
4
TAM 217 Aircraft Fluid Power Systems
2
TAM 220 Aircraft Covering, Finishes and Woods
2
TAM 224 Aircraft Instrumentation and Avionics Systems
3
TAM 226 Aircraft Electrical Systems
4
TAM 228 Airframe Systems and Inspections
2
    SUB-TOTAL
31
     
GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

Must Include: 

Three credit hours from Area 1. Oral & Written Communication
3
AND    
Three credit hours from Area 5. Technical Literacy
3
May Not Include:  
NST 101 Network Fundamentals
3
    SUB-TOTAL
6
     
PROGRAM REQUIREMENT
MAT 031 Preparatory Mathematics
4
OR    
SPM 030 Self-paced Preparatory Mathematics
NC
    SUB-TOTAL
0-4
     
GRADUATION REQUIREMENT
COM
125
Job Search Strategies
1
    SUB-TOTAL
1
     
It is a graduation requirement of the Aviation Maintenance program for students to: 1) earn a grade of C (70%) or better in all “Core Curriculum” courses and a math course, and 2) take and pass the FAA General and Powerplant or Airframe Aviation Written examinations.
     
    PROGRAM TOTAL
38-42

TAM  107  Federal Regulations for Aviation Technicians.  This course concerns the Federal Aviation Regulations governing aircraft maintenance and mechanic privileges and responsibilities associated with that maintenance.  Students learn research techniques on the Avantext software system in the computer laboratory.  In addition they are taught rudimentary drawing and sketching techniques to use in filling out FAA forms, reading manuals and diagrams and how to make maintenance record entries.  The general curriculum subjects included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix B, are as follows:  Aircraft Drawings, Maintenance Forms and Records, Maintenance Publications, Mechanic Privileges and Limitations.  2 credit hours.

TAM  109  Aircraft Structural Materials and Corrosion Control.  Major topics in this course include structural materials identification, metalworking and fabrication processes, non-destructive testing procedures and corrosion treatment and prevention.  The general curriculum subjects included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix B, are as follows:  Corrosion Control and Materials and Processes.  2 credit hours.

TAM  113   General Mechanics.  This course covers aircraft weight and balance theory and terminology, FAA requirements for documentation, practical problems and application.  Laboratory activities include actual weighing of an aircraft and related computations.  Also included are practical problems involving aircraft alterations with related weight and balance computations, adverse loading checks, and ballast and weight shift problems.  Ground handling and servicing covers shop and flight line safety, including fire safety and procedures, jacking safety and hazardous materials procedures.  Towing and taxiing aircraft, including engine-starting procedures are part of the laboratory activities.  Tie-down techniques, standard hand signals and fueling safety and procedures are also covered.  Servicing with ground power units, oxygen and other related items used on aircraft are discussed and performed in the laboratory.  Fluid lines and fittings are covered in this course.  Topics covered are materials and hardware required to fabricate all types of both rigid and flexible fluid lines.  Fabrication techniques and installation procedures are included in the laboratory activities.  The general curriculum subjects included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix B, are as follows:  Weight and Balance, Ground Operation and Servicing, Fluid Lines and Fittings.  2 credit hours.

TAM  125    Basic Electricity.  Basic electricity theory is covered in this course including static and current electricity, basic electrical units, terminology and magnetism.  Circuit components are discussed and complex DC circuits are analyzed using Ohm’s Law and power formulas.  Different methods of generating electrical energy are covered and laboratory projects include fabrication and testing of circuits containing a variety of components.  A unit on the theory, testing and maintenance of batteries rounds out the DC phase of this course.  Primary and secondary batteries including lead-acid and nickel-cadmium types are included.  The AC phase of the course involves mathematically analyzing inductive and capacitive circuits including power formulas.  Solid-state devices are introduced and theory discussed.  A final unit on testing and troubleshooting is covered in this course.  Extensive laboratory projects are used in this phase. The general curriculum subject included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix B, is Basic Electricity.  2 credit hours.

TAM  127  Reciprocating Engines and Lubrication Systems.  The history, theory, design, development and maintenance of aircraft reciprocating engines and the terminology and techniques associated therewith are addressed in this course.  A study of lubrication systems for both, reciprocating engines and turbine engines is also included.  Laboratory activities may include disassembly, reassembly, overhaul, repair, inspection, removal, installation, rigging and testing of aircraft reciprocating engines and engine lubrication systems.  This course provides the opportunity for students to develop skills in the use of maintenance publications and the documentation of maintenance activities.  The powerplant curriculum subjects included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix D are as follows:  Reciprocating Engines and Lubrication Systems.  4 credit hours.

TAM  131  Propeller Systems.  The lecture portion of this course addresses the history, development, theory of operation and application of fixed-pitch propellers through constant-speed propellers with reverse and feather features.  In lab, students may remove, replace, inspect, service, or repair propellers, propeller accessories, or propeller auxiliary systems.  The use of maintenance publications, and the documentation of maintenance activities will be emphasized.  The powerplant curriculum subject included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix D is Propellers.  2 credit hours.

TAM  134  Turbine Engines and Accessory Systems.  Thorough reviews of the history, development, design, theory and application of various types of turbine engines, and auxiliary systems for both, reciprocating engines and turbines engines, are provided in the lecture portion of this course.  Lab activities may include the removal and replacement, inspection, overhaul, repair and adjustment of turbine engines, and auxiliary systems for reciprocating engines and turbine engines.  The powerplant curriculum subjects included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix D, are as follows:   Turbine Engines, Auxiliary Power Units, Unducted Fans, Engine Cooling Systems, Engine Exhaust and Reverser Systems, Induction and Engine Airflow Systems.  4 credit hours.

TAM  136   Powerplant Fuel Systems.  In this course, students learn about aircraft fuels, engine fuel systems components and fuel metering devices.  Lecture topics include float carburetors, pressure injection carburetors, fuel injection systems and turbine engine fuel controls.  Laboratory activities may include the inspection, service and repair of fuel systems, pumps, valves, filters, and metering units.  The Powerplant curriculum subjects included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix D, are Fuel Metering Systems and Engine Fuel Systems.  2 credit hours.

TAM  139  Powerplant Electrical Systems.  Aircraft charging systems, motors and engine starting and ignition systems are the major topics in this course.  In lab, students may inspect powerplant electrical systems installation, and inspect, service and repair electrical systems components.  The powerplant curriculum subjects included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix D, are Engine Electrical Systems and Ignition and Starting Systems.  4 credit hours.

TAM  150  Physics for Aviation Maintenance Technicians.  Physics concepts with particular application in the aviation maintenance field are covered in this lecture/laboratory course.  Standard topics of matter, energy, work, power, force, motion, and gas and fluid mechanics are included.  These principles, together with Newton’s laws and atmospheric science are then used to introduce aerodynamics for fixed and rotor wing aircraft. The general curriculum subject included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix B, is Basic Physics.  2 credit hours.

TAM  200   Auxiliary Systems and Inspections for Powerplants.  All of the subject areas in the powerplant curriculum culminate in this course, to provide students with the opportunity to hone skills learned earlier.  Periodic inspections of reciprocating or turbine engines, propellers or engine accessories are typical activities in lab.  These inspections include extensive research of maintenance publications and effective documentation of inspection activities.  Students may also inspect, service and repair, fire protection systems and powerplant instrument systems.  The powerplant curriculum subjects included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix D are as follows:  Engine Fire Protection Systems, Engine Instrument Systems and Engine Inspections.  Prerequisite:  At least eight credit hours of course work in the powerplant curriculum, or the transfer of an equivalent course work, or documentation of significant experience in the maintenance of aircraft engines, or instructor’s permission are requirements for entry into this course.  5 credit hours.

TAM  208   Introduction to Aircraft Welding.  This course focuses on the various types of welding used with aircraft structural materials.  Introduces the student to oxy-gas welding as well as arc welding.  Includes introduction to soldering and brazing of steel sheet and tube steel.  Students will demonstrate skills in the fabrication and repair of a steel tube cluster as outlined in AC-43.13 1B.  The airframe curriculum subject included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix C, is Welding.  2 credit hours.

TAM  211   Assembly and Rigging.  Assembly and rigging (adjustment) of aircraft primary structures (wings, stabilizers and landing gear), and primary and secondary flight controls (ailerons, rudders trim tabs, etc.) is the primary emphasis of this course.  A review of aerodynamics for fixed and rotor wing aircraft is also included.  The airframe curriculum subject included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix C, is Assembly and Rigging.  2 credit hours.

TAM  213  Sheetmetal and Non-metallic Structures.  Provides foundation for understanding design and construction, as related to sheetmetal and non-metallic aircraft structures.  Introduces students to the various materials used in aircraft fabrication and repair.  Laboratory activities include selection and installation of various fasteners, installation of conventional rivets, sheetmetal flat layouts and rivet pattern layouts.  Provides knowledge of composite structural designs, inspection methods, fabrication and repair procedures. The airframe curriculum subject included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix C, is Sheetmetal and Non-metallic Structures.  4 credit hours.

TAM  217   Aircraft Fluid Power Systems.  This course covers physical principles and mathematical analysis of hydraulic systems, characteristics of different types of hydraulic fluids, small and large aircraft hydraulic systems and their applications, different types of hydraulic control systems and pneumatic systems.  Various types of aircraft landing gear are covered, including aircraft ground steering systems, wheels, tires, braking systems, landing gear shock struts and related hardware.  All types of braking systems are studied from simple mechanically operated brakes to hydraulically boosted systems with anti-skid systems on large aircraft.  Aircraft tires and tubes are covered thoroughly including inspection, removal and replacement.  All subjects in this course emphasize laboratory projects involving disassembly, inspection, repair and installation of components on aircraft.  Retractable landing gear hydraulic systems are thoroughly studied including electrical control, position and warning systems. The airframe curriculum subjects included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix C, are as follows:  Aircraft Landing Gear Systems, Hydraulic and Pneumatic Power Systems, Position and Warning Systems.  2 credit hours.

TAM  220  Aircraft Covering, Finishes and Woods.  The covering of exterior surfaces and internal structures, to prevent corrosion, as well as to beautify, is one of the major areas of aircraft maintenance.  In this course, students learn about aircraft wooden structures, fabric coverings for aircraft structures, and the various paints and sealers used to protect them.  Students also learn techniques for the inspection, and preparation prior to sealing and painting of wood and metal aircraft structures, and wood, metal and fabric surfaces.  The airframe curriculum subjects included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix C, are as follows:  Aircraft Coverings, Aircraft Finishes, and Wood Structures.  2 credit hours.

TAM  224   Aircraft Instrumentation and Avionics Systems.  Most aircraft operating under visual flight rules typically include instruments to indicate flight conditions such as attitude, altitude, airspeed and heading, other instruments to indicate engine and airframe systems conditions, and VHF radios for communication and navigation.  A transponder, and other systems, to interact with the local air traffic control are necessary for instrument flight rules.  In this course, students learn how these systems work, the regulations that pertain to them, and how to install, inspect, and check systems components for operation.  The airframe curriculum subjects included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix C, are as follows:  Aircraft Instrument Systems and Communication and Navigation Systems.  3 credit hours.

TAM  226   Aircraft Electrical Systems.  This course addresses the operation and maintenance of electrical charging systems and power distribution systems for large and small aircraft as well as the fabrication and installation of electrical wiring and electrical systems components.  The airframe curriculum subject included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix C is Aircraft Electrical Systems.  4 credit hours.

TAM  228   Airframe Systems and Inspections.  Provides detailed instruction of airframe auxiliary systems.  Includes cabin pressurization control, ice and rain systems, airframe fire protection and basic aircraft fuel systems.  Learning opportunities include inspection, repair overhaul and servicing of such systems.  Students will demonstrate troubleshooting skills using proper procedures and practices as outlined by the manufacturer.  FAA airframe inspection requirements and proper logbook entries are also discussed. The airframe curriculum subjects included in this course and required by FAR Part 147, Appendix C, are as follows:  Cabin Atmosphere, Ice and Rain Control Systems, Aircraft Fuel Systems, Fire Protection and Airframe Inspection.  2 credit hours.

TAM 299  Special Topics in Aviation Maintenance.  Special Topics in Aviation Maintenance (TAM) may include instruction on topics not covered in other TAM courses.  Topics covered in other TAM courses may also be covered in more depth in this special topics course.  Projects may be undertaken in any area related to the major program with credit hours determined by the level and amount of involvement.  The minimum involvement required for one credit is 30 contact hours.  The specific topic(s), objectives, plan of instruction, and evaluation criteria must be documented in the syllabus; approved by the Department/Division Chair; and filed in the Academic Records Office.  Students may complete more than one Special Topics course, provided that the credits earned in this manner do not exceed a total of four (4) credits.  1-4 credit hours.






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